Labour | More financial mastery

5 06 2010

Another day and another disclosure of the previous Labour Government’s criminal mishandling of the public purse.  This time to the tune of £1.8bn being ferried to various ‘consultants’ in another extension of the money-merry-go-round.

It isn’t a rabbit hole we’re peeping into, it is an intricate, air-conditioned, Fort Knoxesque-locked, sharks with frikking laser beams attached to their heads’ moated tunnel network that makes the Vietnam era ones look like a badgers nest.

Labour ministers spent £1.8bn on consultants in ONE YEAR, public spending records reveal

By Gerri Peev, Daily Wail.  Last updated at 4:48 PM on 4th June 2010

Labour ministers spent an astonishing £1.8billion on consultants in a single year – double the amount of the previous 12 months, it was revealed today.

The figure was unveiled in the first publication of the government’s entire expenditure. For the first time ever, the Treasury released a massive database which details spending line by line.

Labour’s spendthrift habit was laid bare across the 24 million individual entries for the year 2009-10.

Sources from the incoming government said they were ‘shocked’ at how much Labour had spent on consultants, particularly at the height of the economic crisis.

The Department of Health was the biggest spender, splashing out nearly half a billion pounds – £480,420,000 in one year alone.

It was followed by the Department for International Development, which spent £288,100,000 on consultants, despite its main aim being to provide aid to the world’s poor.

The scandal-plagued Home Office hired consultants to the tune of £194,116,000.

The £1.8billion consultancy bill is the equivalent of nearly a third of the cuts that will be felt across Whitehall departments and public services this year.

In 2007/8, the 16 biggest Whitehall departments spent £909million on consultants.

The Combined Online Information System  released yesterday has the apt acronym, COINS.

But the Con-Lib government’s claim that it heralded openness was met with some scepticism, as the database is too vast and unusable for anyone but computer and data experts to decipher.

Before they were in government, the Conservatives had talked up the prospect of the database creating a £6billion private industry which would crunch and analyse the data.

The party’s manifesto said: ‘Our plans to open up government data and spending information will not only help us to cut wasteful spending, but according to new research… it will also create an estimated £6bn in additional value for the UK.’

Danny Alexander, the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, said it paved the way for more transparency across government.

‘For too long, the previous government acted as if the public had no right to know where their hard-earned taxes were spent.

‘Today we have lifted that veil of secrecy by releasing detailed spending figures dating back to 2008.

‘This data is complex, but this is a major step forward and shows we are delivering on our promise to make this government more open and transparent while ensuring we deliver value for money for the taxpayer.

‘I hope people will take the opportunity to scrutinise carefully how their money is being spent – as I am doing every day in preparation for the spending review.’

‘We plan to release more data in the coming months that will be easier for the general public to understand.’

The Taxpayers’ Alliance welcomed the publication of the database, and  hailed it as a victory for its campaign to unveil the public finances.

Matthew Elliott, chief executive of the TaxPayers’ Alliance, said: ‘The publication of the COINS database is another fantastic victory for transparency.

‘The TaxPayers’ Alliance has long campaigned for this level of openness about public spending, as the public have a right to know how their taxes are being spent.

‘It is right that this data is out in the public domain, saving departments time and money responding to Freedom of Information requests.

‘The next step is for this trend to continue, so that all information about government spending is available, allowing the public to call the government to account.

‘There is an army of enthusiastic, skilled amateurs out there who will gladly explore and use this information to suggest ways in which the Government can save money and improve public services.’

Former Labour minister Jim Knight, warned that there could be privacy implications however.

He said: ‘These days, people can mesh government data with commercially available data. That can give you data right down to the level of a few houses.

‘It won’t be hard to get down virtually to the individual. Some would argue that gets pretty scary.’

Love how the politicians love to claim privacy this and privacy that when it involves anything to do with our fight against political corruption but change their tune when it is the pleb’s privacy at stake in their war on terror, drugs and violence.

The first act of any new government is to hold the old one to account.  Sadly, that will not be done for it is exactly what the ConDem’s plan to do.  Over twenty-million deluded souls voted for the Status Quo.  For the continuation of the greatest scam ever conceived, government.

We’re doomed.

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